Courses
Major Courses

103.208A  <English Literature up to Milton>
This is a historical survey of English literature from the very beginning up to Milton’s Paradise Lost. One play by Shakespeare-preferably I Henry IV-will be included in the syllabus. Old English and Medieval texts, except for Chaucer. will be read in modern English version.

103.207A  <English Literature from Restoration to Reform Bills>
This is a historical survey of English literature from Restoration(1660) to the second Reform Bill(1867), covering Restoration literature, Augustan literature, the Age of Sensibility, Romantic literature, and early Victorian literature. The differences between the periods will be noted, while reading the major poems of major poets from Dryden to Browning. At least one novel will be included in addition to a selection of prose.

103.220   <20th-Century English Literature>
This is the first survey of English literature for the English major, covering the latter half of the Victorian literature, Modernism movement, and canonical contemporary literature. The survey will provide an opportunity to have glimpses of contemporary British society and culture.

103.325   <Shakespeare>
This course studies selected plays of Shakespeare. Students will closely examine its language, plot and dramatic effects.

103.326A  <18th- and 19th-Century English Novel>
This is a study of the major British novels of the eighteenth and nineteenth century, including works by Defoe, Jane Austen, Scott, and Hardy.

103.334   <20th-Century English Novel>
Selective reading of the English novels from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. A comparative understanding of major Modernist and Postmodernist works will be among the main objectives, but the recent achievements of the Anglophonic authors outside the United Kingdom and the United States may also be examined.

103.332   <English Poetry 1>
Selective reading of English poetry from its beginning in the Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century. The course aims for a balanced understanding of major poetic works not readily accessible through survey courses. Literary influences and sociocultural contexts will also be explored. A list of authors may include: the Beowulf Poet, Chaucer, Sidney, Spenser, Donne, Jonson, Herbert, Marvell, Dryden, Swift, and Pope.

103.333   <English Poetry 2>
Selective reading of English poetry from the late eighteenth century to the present. The course aims for a balanced understanding of major poetic works not readily accessible through survey courses. Literary influences and sociocultural contexts will also be explored. A list of authors may include: Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Yeats, and Eliot.

103.336   <English Drama>
Overview of English drama from the late medieval and early modern periods to the mid-nineteenth century. The main focus will be on representative Renaissance authors excluding Shakespeare, but important works from other periods will also be examined. A sound understanding of individual works will be emphasized along with the acquisition of broad historical perspectives.

103.306A  <American Literature up to 1900>
This course is the first half of the survey of American literature and literary history, covering writings by American writers from the early colonial period to late 19th-century. We will examine how the authors contributed to the American literary tradition by reading a wide range of writers and genres. Authors will range from canonical writers such as Franklin, Hawthorne, Emerson, Melville, Whitman, Poe and Twain, as well as lesser known writers such as Bradstreet, Rowlandson and Equiano. By putting the canonical texts together with texts that have been considered to be marginal, we will attempt to gain a broader understanding of American literary history.

103.338   <20th-Century American Literature>
This course is the second half of the survey of American literature and literary history, covering writings from early 1900’s to the present. The focus of this course will be close reading of representative texts, while examining the historical, social and cultural contexts of the period. Also, in reading selected fiction, prose, drama, and poetry, we will attempt to understand how the canon of American literature has changed in recent times. Selections will include the great classical texts by writers such as Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Williams, Frost as well as well as works which have recently been incorporated into the canon, including Morrison and Chang-rae Lee.

103.214A  <19th-Century American Novel>
This is a study of the major American novels of the nineteenth century, including works by Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, and James.

103.335   <20th-Century American Novel>
Selective reading of the American novels from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. A comparative understanding of major Modernist and Postmodernist works will be among the main objectives, but the achievements of the minority authors including the African-American and Asian- American novelists may also be examined.

103.404   <American Poetry>
This course engages students in the readings of the major American poets.

103.337   <Modern English and American Drama>
Overview of English and American drama from the late nineteenth century to the present. The main focus will be on major dramatic movements and experiments after Henrik Ibsen. A sound understanding of individual works will be emphasized along with the acquisition of broad historical perspectives.

103.407   <English and American Literary Criticism>
This course provides an introduction to literary criticism and includes the work of Poe and Sidney. It also discusses current trends in literary criticism.

103.419   <Studies in English and American Authors>
This course provides intensive study of a selected writer or school of writers.

103.331   <Topics in English and American Literature>
This course will be taught by foreign instructors. The topics dealt with in the course may vary every semester; instructors will select from a wide variety of topics in English and American literature, history, and culture. The discussion will be conducted in English, and likewise, the papers will have to be written in English. Students taking this course will be able to enhance their competence in English as well as to acquire knowledge in their major field.

103.219 <English Composition>
Intensive writing course for the students of English Language and Literature. The course helps students progress step by step from organizing a paragraph to composing a longer essay. This linear progress will be accompanied in each stage by systematic lessons on basic elements of writing, such as logic, style, grammar, and mechanics. Students are required to integrate reading and writing by responding critically to a wide variety of literary and cultural texts.

103.205 <Survey of English Linguistics>
This is an introduction to the structure of English language and methods of modern linguistics. Students are introduced to a variety of phonological, historical, morphological, syntactic and semantic studies of English.

103.201 <English Grammar>
This is a course to study the structure of English grammar and its correct usage. The course is designed to help students understand and master the principles and rules of the English language.

103.216 < Structure of English>
This is a study of theoretical issues in English syntax or phonology, focusing on current analyses of various grammatical and phonological structures.

103.221 <Applied English Linguistics>
This is an introductory course for applied linguistics, which includes various fields such as sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, second language acquisition, foreign language teaching and learning, and discourse analysis. This course will help students understand what these fields are, what major issues and concerns each field deals with, and how various linguistic phenomena in English can be analyzed using methodologies in each field. The course will focus on practical aspects of English such as varieties of English in the world, different uses of English depending on discourse context, English language acquisition and teaching methodologies.

103.320 <History of English Language>
This is an introduction to the historical development of English language, examining both its intrinsic, such as sounds, vocabulary, grammar, lexicon and extrinsic history, including social, political and intellectual forces that have influenced the language.

103.420 <Topics in English Linguistics>
This course will be taught by foreign instructors. The topics dealt with in the course may vary every semester; instructors will select from a wide variety of topics in English and American literature, history, and culture. The discussion will be conducted in English, and likewise, the papers will have to be written in English. Students taking this course will be able to enhance their competence in English as well as to acquire knowledge in their major field.